Meets: Katsuya Terada & Hirokazu Yasuhara

I interviewed Katsuya Terada & Hirokazu Yasuhara and wrote article in Dec. issue on The Bulletin/Geppo Magazine.

 今回は新年スペシャルバージョンと称して「落書きing」な漫画家でありアーティストの寺田克也さんとゲーム、「ソニック」の生みの親、安原広和さんと東京で飲んだ時のお話です。とはいえ、ただただ飲んで食べていただけなので話の内容はほぼ覚えておらず…ただただ楽しかった笑

バンクーバーの日系雑誌、
“The Bulletin Magazine”の12月号に掲載です!

Book Camp:

Learn how to draw children’s books using Photoshop by Sleepless Kao

August 14 – 18, 2017

At Vancouver Public Library

Calling all aspiring writers and book lovers! Sharpen your pencils, stretch your typing fingers, and spark your imagination at VPL’s Writing & Book Camp! Our inclusive program welcomes youth who want to try creative writing for the first time, aspiring authors with mountains of manuscripts, and everyone in between!

more info about Book Camp

Creators Vancouver:

Interviewed by “Creators Vancouver” online Magazine

Creators Vancouver profiles professional artists and designers across a broad range of fields

Read more about the interview with Sleepless Kao by Creators Vancouver

 

Winterruption:

Open Air Illustration for Winterruption Festival on Granville Island by Sleepless Kao February 17-19, 2017

Granville Island presents the 12th Winterruption Festival. This mid-winter celebration of Vancouver culture and arts features live music, theatre, dance and street performance plus art, film, crafts, family activities and, of course, great food!

Look out for the 2017 festival poster featuring Kao’s cute illustration!

more info about Winterruption

 

love art:

An Exhibition of New Works by Sleepless Kao & Jodi Sam
At Branches & Knots

February 10-28, 2017

Opening Reception Friday,
February 10th, 2017, 6PM – 9PM

This exhibition premiers Sleepless Kao’s original paintings for her upcoming projects, and her new artwork

About Branches & Knots
A fashion & lifestyle retailer carrying unique items from Japan, Europe and Vancouver in the trendy area of Kitsilano, Vancouver

The Book Wars:

Interviewed by The Book Wars

Read more about Interview Sleepless Kao by The Book Wars

Drawing Night & Day:

An Exhibition of New Works by Sleepless Kao & Lisa Cinar
At Visual Space May 22 – 24, 2014

Opening Reception
Thursday, May 22, 2014 6pm – 9pm

The exhibition premiers original paintings from Kao’s upcoming children’s book Emily and the Mighty Om . Featuring more than 40 works includes digital prints and limited edition silkscreen prints. This exhibition offers an opportunity to experience the world of childlike playfulness and kawaii (cute in Japanese).

“Little creatures pop out of my brain around midnight and tell me, “play with me”. They demand more room, so I put them onto large canvases. Other creatures do not stop moving, so I make a short animation of them.”

– Sleepless Kao

Read more about Exhibition

Opening reception at CHOTTO MOTTO:

なんとなんと、池田学くんが来てくれましたよ

展覧会オープニングはたくさんの人に来て頂き、たのしい時間を過ごすことができました

遠くにいて来て頂けなかった方も、応援メールや電話、ありがとうございました

Blimギャラリーで12月29日までやっていますので、近くにおいでの際はぜひ立ち寄ってみて下さい

CHOTTO MOTTO:

An Exhibition of New Works by Sleepless Kao At Blim, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Opening: Friday, December 2nd. 8:00pm -11:00pm
Show Runs December 2 – 29,  2011

Little creatures pop out of Kao’s brain around midnight and tell her, “more, more…”. They demand more room, so she puts them onto large canvases. Other creatures do not stop moving, so she makes a short animation of them. Come to BLIM to see Kao’s work

Enjoy chotto mottoholiday gifts by Kao, including prints, dolls, lucky-charms, and a little more

“A single chotto means little, but Japanese often say “chotto, chotto” which asks for someone’s attention, like “hey you!” Motto means more, and we often say “motto motto” meaning “yes, yes, more please”. If I was telling a story and I paused, you might say “motto motto”, asking me to continue with my story. Chotto motto together is an odd combination because they are opposites; I like the feeling of this odd pairing. There is a cultural difference between Japan and Canada which I still struggle with. Some aspects of traditional Japanese culture are passive-aggressive by Western standards, but they come from a pure/good intention. Japanese do not like to expose aggression, so we calmly speak in an indirect fashion. In relation to my show, I am saying in a polite way, “here I am, look what I have done”, but I am trying to be modest at the same time”

-from Interviewed by The Province